Story Of Europe

A city, Tyre, witness of men and their greatness for six thousand years, which successively hosted the Phoenicians, Persians, Greeks, Romans, Byzantines, Arabs, Crusaders, Ottomans...

A continent and a people who bear the name of a nymph, Europe...

A mosaic found in Byblos, Roman era, late second-early third century AD.

Observing the details of the mosaic, the classic author Achilles Tatius offers his version of the abduction of Europe: “The bull was represented in the middle of the sea, riding the waves… The girl was sitting on the middle of his back, not astride, but sideways, with both feet on the right and she held the horns with her left hand like a charioteer holding the reins, and in fact, the animal veered slightly in this direction, obeying the hand pressure. The girl’s bust was covered with a tunic that fell down to the bottom of her legs, and a dress hid the lower part of her body (...). Her hands were far apart from each other, one on the bull’s horns, the other on the rump, and in one and the other, she was holding above her head a large scarf hovering around her shoulders, and the fabric was blown away from all sides, as a way for the artist to represent the wind. Hence, the girl was sitting on the bull like a ship at sea and the scarf served her as a sail”.

A myth that narrates how a god of thunder and clouds, Zeus, abducted, under the appearance of a white bull, that young virgin daughter of Agenor, Phoenician king of Tyre, and carried her to Crete. From their union were born four sons, among them Minos, most famous for his justice and wisdom and who became the first king of Crete.

Europe found her baptismal name and the world its most useful communication system, since Cadmus, the brother who went looking for Europe in vain, founded Thebes and taught the Greeks the use of the Phoenician alphabet...

Through the legacy of Europe, the nymph, and Tyre, her hometown, many people became open to the immense contribution of the Middle Eastern civilizations who have systematized for the first time in Sumer, Egypt, the coherences of the universe. This is also how the Phoenician expansion, of which Tyre was the center, has consolidated a horizon of permanent exchanges from the eleventh to the eighth century BC, while bringing a message of peace and civilization to many Mediterranean countries.

The Phoenicians worshiped a number of gods, but they distinguished themselves from other peoples because they believed in three gods, the divine God Creator named “EL”, the mother of God and fertility named “Baalah” and the son of the God named “Baal”. According to some theories, they have come to the idea of ​​one God before the Jews published it. Both god and goddess have the same qualities, abilities and even private ritual but the names vary from one city to another. For example, God “Baal” is called “Baal” in Byblos, “Melkart” in Tyre and “Jupiter” in Baalbek. They often rely on rituals and animal sacrifices, agricultural and diving in "holy water" pools for the healing of diseases as was the case, for example, in the Temple of Ashmoun in Saida. Lebanese traditions are still affected by the legacy of the Phoenician, for example, they are still talking about the "cultivation of Baal," which means they arose it with the water of the rain water that comes from Baal God. Even the mechanized agriculture is still very close to the one that the Phoenicians adopt.